Event Details

Please register by Thursday, January 18th, 2018. If you register and need to cancel, please do so by contacting [email protected] by Thursday, January 18th, 2018 to avoid a no-show fee (Members = $20; Guests = $25).

Fee: The fee for CAPSGW members in good standing is:
• FREE for those that pre-register on Eventbrite
• $20 for those that register at the door
Guests are invited and encouraged to attend, but are limited to 1 non-member guest per member. The fee for guests is:
• $25 for those that pre-register on Eventbrite
• $40 for those that register at the door
Registration at the door fees are payable via cash, check or credit card at the door.

Agenda: 7:00pm: Check-In and Appetizers – 7:45pm: Speakers and Dinner

CME Credit: 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits

Dr. Daniel Pine is Chief, Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience, in the National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program. Dr. Pine moved to this position in 2000, after 10 years of training, teaching, and research at Columbia University. Since graduating from medical school at the University of Chicago, Dr. Pine has been engaged continuously in research on pediatric mental disorders, as reflected in more than 450 peer-reviewed papers. Currently, his group examines the degree to which pediatric mood and anxiety disorders are associated with perturbed neural circuitry function. Dr. Pine served as the Chair of the Psychopharmacologic Drug Advisory Committee for the Food and Drug Administration, Chair of the Child and Adolescent Disorders Work Group for the DSM-5 Task Force, and President of the Society of Biological Psychiatry. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and has received many other awards.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this event, participants will

1. Understand the key phenomenological distinctions among the varied pediatric anxiety disorders;

2. Understand the process through which clinical research on therapeutics is informed by basic research in systems neuroscience; and

3. Understand the direction in which ongoing research on therapeutics is moving, from basic research to novel applications through cognitive training.